So, I told you earlier how much I enjoyed my visit to the Hirshhorn Museum and its courtyard. Right across the road from it there’s the Sculpture Garden. In my imagination I had imagined a vast garden with beautiful plantation and different kinds of modern artworks scattered around and some even hidden playfully among the plants, adding to the garden’s natural beauty. But things turned out to be more straight forward: No impressive plantation whatsoever! Ok, the winter weather didn’t help much either, but still! But let’s start with first impressions first!

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I left the Hishhorn Museum with the best impressions. So I crossed the road and this caught my eye:

Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden Jeff Koons

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Shame on me, but from a distance I thought it was one of those street artists, who stand still while staring at infinity and only move when someone offers them money! 😀 I was convinced I was wrong only after I saw the label: Kiepenkerl by Jeff Koons! No wonder Jeff Koons is so controversial! I had to laugh at myself for this mistake!

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Then I took the steps that led me to the actual garden and here are some of the main sculptures I saw:

Post-Balzac by Judith Shea

Post-Balzac by Judith Shea. I liked this one!

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Eros, inside Eros by Arman. This one was so interesting to look at from all around and through all its levels!

Eros, inside Eros by Arman. This one was so interesting to look at from all around and through all its levels!

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Draped reclining figure by Henry Moore. I admired her near plank position because I admire everyone who can do a good plank, as I'm clearly not one of them! And then I moved on!

Draped reclining figure by Henry Moore. I admired her near plank position because I admire everyone who can do a good plank, as I’m clearly not one of them! And then I moved on!

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Now this one was creepy! Imagine walking in the Sculpture Garden and then you see a head like this behind the bushes! After the initial shock, I went closer for the introductions, so this one is Monumental Head by Alberto Giacometti! Under the description there was a warning not to touch the sculpture! I wouldn't anyway, thanks!

Now this one was creepy! Imagine walking in the Sculpture Garden and then you see a head like this behind the bushes! After the initial shock, I went closer for the introductions, so this one is Monumental Head by Alberto Giacometti! Under the description there was a warning not to touch the sculpture! I wouldn’t anyway, thanks!

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Now this is one I couldn't really take seriously either! It's The Drummer by Barry Flanagan. No matter how many times I've looked at it, it will always look awkward in my eyes! Anyone who loves this, please, speak up!

Now this is one I couldn’t really take seriously either! It’s The Drummer by Barry Flanagan. No matter how many times I’ve looked at it, it will always look awkward in my eyes! Anyone who loves this, please, speak up!

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King and Queen by Henry Moore

King and Queen by Henry Moore

Young Girl on a Chair by Giacomo Manzù. You can also see the Hirschhorn Museum building in the background, too. This one was very pretty! And interesting from most angles.

Young Girl on a Chair by Giacomo Manzù. You can also see the Hirshhorn Museum building in the background, too. This one was very pretty! And interesting from most angles. Simple and elegant.

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And this is what a big part of the Garden looks like:

Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden

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Overall impressions:

  • There was nothing too impressive, especially when it comes to its gardening!
  • All sculptures were of similar style or material, so it lacked the variety of styles of the Museum artworks and of contemporary art in general.
  • I need to keep my eyes more open, so I can differentiate between random street artists and modern art leading representatives (like Jeff Koons) and between peeping behind bushes and Monumental Heads!
  • The Hirshhorn Sculpture Garden made for a nice addition to the Museum, but I wouldn’t recommend it as a standalone art venue, especially in Washington DC’s National Mall, where museums and arts are plentiful.
  • Having said that, with a free entrance to it and quite extensive opening hours (7:30 am till dusk), maybe we needn’t be too fussy, right?

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What did you think of it? Does it take an arts geek to appreciate it or does it make for a pleasant stroll for every passer by?